Guy Martin: When You Dead, You Dead

Guy Martin: When You Dead, You Dead

Guy Martin

Language: English

Pages: 352

ISBN: 0753556677

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


"The maddest 12 months of my life. The journey starts with an oddball race up an American mountain and ends with me checking myself out of hospital with a broken back. Again. . ."

As Guy Martin's grandfather Voldemars frequently reminded him, "When you dead, you dead." So, before it's all over, Guy Martin is making the most of the time he’s got. In this past year alone, Guy has raced the Isle of Man TT and finished on the podium; bike trekked through India; competed in solo 24-hour bicycles races; flown a stunt plane; broken a go-kart speed record down a French mountain; and dusted himself off after a dramatic crash at the Dunrod 150 Superbike race. And he’s done all this around his day job as a truck mechanic. But let Guy tell you about it himself: "This book starts in a Transit, ends in a Transit, and in between I’ve raced a few pushbikes, raced a few motorbikes and got a fair few stories to tell you." Spot on.

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trucks at this yard were all Ashok Leyland. Foreign companies can’t set up a factory in India, they have to partner up with an Indian company, like Honda and Hero did. So you couldn’t do what Nissan or Toyota have done in the UK, move in and set up a solely Japanese-owned car plant, you have to be in business with the Indians. I think it’s quite a clever move on the surface. Leyland set up in India in 1948, earlier than Royal Enfield, but in the same city of Chennai, which used to be known as

thought it was a brilliant event for the whole of motorcycling, but dirt track especially. I can’t think of a ball sport equivalent – for which you could take a top footballer, top tennis player, top rugby player, put them all together and make them compete in something where they would all be so evenly matched as we were and for it to be a proper event worth paying to watch. The motorbikers were all from different disciplines, but all chucked into this one oddball event, and they were all there

organising, they’d have to do it again. Sorry. There so much about the job I love. I love calling in at Fleet Factors for parts and having a yarn with Paddy and Dean behind the counter. They’re as dry as owt, but funny. Then there’s Nige and Rick at Action Truck Parts. I always have a brew when I go there. When I call in for parts at either of these companies I’ll ask them, ‘What do you know?’ And nine times out of ten I’ll learn something. Back in the yard, I have the same kind of small talk

in air to show it’s much worse than you hoped it was. I was meant to do two days’ filming, but I got it down to one. The second part of the pilot’s refresher course was to go in the centrifuge at Farnborough for assessment. This is the thing you might have seen in the James Bond film Moonraker. It’s where a person is strapped into a seat in a pod on the end of an arm, a bit like a fairground ride, and spun around faster and faster. The pilots are all wired up and monitored to make sure they are

How much time I’ve put into this bloody car, but I love it. This is the Volvo’s engine and it’s a proper bit of kit, but I’ve completely rebuilt it twice now, because it shit itself. It’s still the fastest, coolest Volvo ever. The Transit and my dirt track bike, somewhere in Spain. I love a road trip in a van, especially when there’s a push-bike or motorbike in the back. The Honda CRF450 I bought and converted into a flat tracker for the Superprestigio. This is near Wanganui, New Zealand, on a

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