The Tale of Benjamin Bunny

The Tale of Benjamin Bunny

Beatrix Potter

Language: English

Pages: 6

ISBN: 0723242984

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


This original, authorised version has been lovingly recreated electronically for the first time, with reproductions of Potter's unmistakeable artwork optimised for use on colour devices such as the iPad.

Peter Rabbit's cousin, Benjamin Bunny, has been a very popular character since this book's first publication in 1904. In this tale we hear all about his and Peter's adventures in Mr McGregor's vegetable garden, and what happens to them when they meet a cat! Even more frightening, is what happens to the two pesky bunnies when Old Mr Benjamin Bunny finds out what they have been up to!

The Tale of Benjamin Bunny is number four in Beatrix Potter's series of 23 little books, the titles of which are as follows:

1 The Tale of Peter Rabbit
2 The Tale of Squirrel Nutkin
3 The Tailor of Gloucester
4 The Tale of Benjamin Bunny
5 The Tale of Two Bad Mice
6 The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle
7 The Tale of Mr. Jeremy Fisher
8 The Tale of Tom Kitten
9 The Tale of Jemima Puddle-Duck
10 The Tale of the Flopsy Bunnies
11 The Tale of Mrs. Tittlemouse
12 The Tale of Timmy Tiptoes
13 The Tale of Johnny Town-Mouse
14 The Tale of Mr. Tod
15 The Tale of Pigling Bland
16 The Tale of Samuel Whiskers
17 The Tale of The Pie and the Patty-Pan
18 The Tale of Ginger and Pickles
19 The Tale of Little Pig Robinson
20 The Story of a Fierce Bad Rabbit
21 The Story of Miss Moppet
22 Appley Dapply's Nursery Rhymes
23 Cecily Parsley's Nursery Rhymes

Dora's Easter Basket (Dora the Explorer)

The Snake Who Wanted To Be A Horse

The Extraordinary Education of Nicholas Benedict (The Mysterious Benedict Society)

Uncle

Three Classic Franklin Stories: Franklin Wants a Pet, Franklin's Blanket, and Franklin's School Play

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beatrix Potter loved the countryside and she spent much of her otherwise conventional Victorian childhood drawing and studying animals. Her passion for the natural world lay behind the creation of her famous series of little books. A particular source of inspiration was the English Lake District where she lived for the last thirty years of her life as a farmer and land conservationist, working with the National Trust. The Tale of Benjamin Bunny continues the story of Beatrix Potter’s first and

green-house, scratching off a handful of fur. The cat was too much surprised to scratch back. When old Mr. Bunny had driven the cat into the green-house, he locked the door. Then he came back to the basket and took out his son Benjamin by the ears, and whipped him with the little switch. Then he took out his nephew Peter. Then he took out the handkerchief of onions, and marched out of the garden. When Mr. McGregor returned about half an hour later, he observed several things

green-house, scratching off a handful of fur. The cat was too much surprised to scratch back. When old Mr. Bunny had driven the cat into the green-house, he locked the door. Then he came back to the basket and took out his son Benjamin by the ears, and whipped him with the little switch. Then he took out his nephew Peter. Then he took out the handkerchief of onions, and marched out of the garden. When Mr. McGregor returned about half an hour later, he observed several things

strung up the onions and hung them from the kitchen ceiling, with the bunches of herbs and the rabbit-tobacco. The End FREDERICK WARNE Published by the Penguin Group Penguin Books Ltd, Registered Offices: 80 Strand, London WC2R 0RL, England Website: www.peterrabbit.com First published by Frederick Warne 1904 This electronic edition first published 2010 New reproductions copyright ©Frederick Warne & Co., 2002 Original copyright in text and illustrations ©Frederick Warne & Co.,

shrunk. Benjamin tried on the tam-o-shanter, but it was too big for him. Then he suggested that they should fill the pocket-handkerchief with onions, as a little present for his Aunt. Peter did not seem to be enjoying himself; he kept hearing noises. Benjamin, on the contrary, was perfectly at home, and ate a lettuce leaf. He said that he was in the habit of coming to the garden with his father to get lettuces for their Sunday dinner. (The name of little Benjamin’s papa was old Mr.

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