Wabi Sabi: The Japanese Art of Impermanence

Wabi Sabi: The Japanese Art of Impermanence

Andrew Juniper

Language: English

Pages: 176

ISBN: 0804834822

Format: PDF / Kindle (mobi) / ePub


Developed out of the aesthetic philosophy of cha-no-yu (the tea ceremony) in fifteenth-century Japan, wabi sabi is an aesthetic that finds beauty in things imperfect, impermanent, and incomplete.

Taken from the Japanese words wabi, which translates to less is more, and sabi, which means attentive melancholy, wabi sabi refers to an awareness of the transient nature of earthly things and a corresponding pleasure in the things that bear the mark of this impermanence. As much a state of mind—an awareness of the things around us and an acceptance of our surroundings—as it is a design style, wabi sabi begs us to appreciate the simple beauty in life—a chipped vase, a quiet rainy day, the impermanence of all things. Presenting itself as an alternative to today's fast-paced, mass-produced, neon-lighted world, wabi sabi reminds us to slow down and take comfort in the simple, natural beauty around us.

In addition to presenting the philosophy of wabi-sabi, this book includes how-to design advice—so that a transformation of body, mind, and home can emerge.

Chapters include:

  • History: The Development of Wabi Sabi
  • Culture: Wabi Sabi and the Japanese Character
  • Art: Defining Aesthetics
  • Design: Creating Expressions with Wabi Sabi Materials
  • Spirit: The Universal Spirit of Wabi Sabi

New Left Review, Volume 319 (January - February 2014)

Asfissiante cultura

Contemporary Chinese Aesthetics

The Art and Aesthetics of Boxing

A Philosophical Enquiry into the Sublime and Beautiful (Penguin Classics)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yanagi Soetsu, a leading figure in the craft movement of Japan, who was vehemently opposed to the so-called high art that he saw bringing down the whole aesthetic sensibility of the Japanese. The overwhelming predominance of the material culture and the frenzied nature of modern life make it difficult for tea masters and participants alike to find complete abandon within the small tearoom. Rikyu’s vision of a sublime meeting of kindred spirits has been some-what lost in the ritual and near

Yanagi Soetsu, a leading figure in the craft movement of Japan, who was vehemently opposed to the so-called high art that he saw bringing down the whole aesthetic sensibility of the Japanese. The overwhelming predominance of the material culture and the frenzied nature of modern life make it difficult for tea masters and participants alike to find complete abandon within the small tearoom. Rikyu’s vision of a sublime meeting of kindred spirits has been some-what lost in the ritual and near

the Nara period. The desire for a nonuniform surface that can catch, in the glaze of each pot, the irregularities of nature hails back to the Japanese love of things that are imperfect and incomplete. When one picks up a tea bowl that has been fired with a random ash glaze, it is hard not to be entranced by the range, depth, and flow of colors that the ash has produced—the kiln has left its indelible mark on the piece. It is not hard to understand why the tea masters and Zen monks were so drawn

Japanese mind, where it remained relatively unchallenged until Japan again opened her borders to the West. The Japanese, consummate artists of observation, were very quick to learn from the West, and within a few decades Japan established herself as a force to be reckoned with. As she assimilated knowledge of the West, Japan was able to pass new ideas through the filter of its own culture and then take the best that each had to offer. This trend has continued down through the ages, and one of

for all the world’s inhabitants, and it is here that the consumer has great power to influence the products being offered on the shelf. Each individual shopper is, with every shopping decision, voting for one product over another, and the sum of these votes alone will determine the activities of suppliers to the market. If enough consumers demand that a product, such as a table, be made so that its design and structure can withstand the test of time, then the market will provide such a table. If

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